It’s all back to front

Well it was about 9 months back when I was touching on Developers in a sysadmin world and my initial thoughts were along the lines of we are better at different tasks, and after spending a week doing only development I am of the same opinion still.

Over the last 6 months we have had our solitary developer, coding away making great things happen, predominately developing a portal that allows us to deploy environments in 15 mins vs the 2 days it took before and the whole things is very pretty, it even has its own Favicon.ico which we are all pleased about. In addition to just deploying, it also allows us to scale up and down the environments it creates and despite constant interruptions it is coming along really well and in the next month we will be providing it as a service to the engineering teams to self serve.

As more and more of our tools are developing we are also in-housing more and more of our tools. As the regular readers know I do dable with the odd slightly more complex program than the average sysadmin might tackle. When we are faced with a situation such as monitoring the operations, by this I mean, the number of user growth week on week and the cost of running the environment(s) it just made more sense to do it our selves. There are tools out there that provide various dashboards like Geckoboard which can all do approximately 80% of the job, but it’s that last 20% that adds the usefulness, as such we are trying to develop tolls that are pluggable and extensible and support multiple outputs. For example the Metrics report we have will also support Geckoboard, Graphite, Email and probably have it’s own web interface.

For us it is becoming more about having the flexibility to add and remove components and keeping the flexibility around it, this introduces challenges with what ever being written needing to be pluggable and easy to maintain, which often make sit complicated.

I used classes, as a necessity

Typically when I program there is not much need for classes or even objects for that matter, a simple var and some nice loops and conditional statements would be plenty. Well not so much anymore, The last project was metrics and as with other projects I got it working within a day or two, and I hated it, it took over 30 seconds for it to run and generate the report I needed but not in the right format and then the level of detail in the metrics was not high enough, it could manage weekly but it was not good enough.

I decided that I’d have a chat with a few developers to help with the structure of the application, at first I was dubious, but it turned out well. The key step which I wouldn’t have made until it was a real problem was to separate out the the tasks that gathers the raw data, the tasks that manipulates the data into useful numbers, the bit that stores the data, the bit that manipulates the data into useful numbers and then finally the bit that outputs the pretty data.

This was an evolutionary step, I would have got to the point of understanding the need to separate each step out but not until it had become a real big pain many months later. Another advantage of splitting it out was how much simpler each step was, there were classes defining methods for getting data that were being used in classes to format the data that were being used… you get the idea. Rather than being one class to connect to amazon, manipulate the data and return an object that could be used to generate the metrics everything was done on much smaller steps. As a result it was a lot easier to write small chunks of code “that just worked” and it made debugging a lot easier, and I feel like I progressed my understanding, and this is always a good thing.

Who should do what

I touched on this in my other post, but I want to amend it based on a better understanding. To summarise I pretty much said as it is, Developers develop, sysadmins admin. They do, and certainly that should be their focus, but I think there is a lot to be gained from both points of view when pushed to work in the others world.

Before our developer joined the focus was on making the build, test and release process better, after forcing the developer to do sysadmin work for a month or so while the team was trying to grow and cope with the loss of a team member, it became clear that the time wasted for us all was not getting a build though but by us not being able to paralise the testing or being agile enough to re-deploy an environment if it was not quite right. These steps and understandings would not have happened if we didn’t encroach on each others work and gain the understanding from the other persons perspective.

Summary

This is what DevOps is really about, forget sysadmins doing code, forget about developers doing sysadmin work, it is about us meeting in the middle and understanding the issues we each face and working together to solve bigger problems.

Category:
Business, Linux, Ruby
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