First the worry

When it comes to releasing the first version of an application it’s always worth weighing up the constraints of your environment and the time frame in which the task was delivered versus the skill set available. Inevitably as a skilled DevOps professional you want to do a good job, well done you; however you have to be strong and realise it is not about delivering perfection from day one but about the journey you must take to get there.

I recall the first deployment I did for a version 1 and every time I do one since then I get better, be it a bit more focused or a better starting point. The very first one I did was all over the place, no real configuration management, quite a few manual steps but a well written process, unfortunately that project remained in the depths of secrecy and I ended up moving on.

Constantly I see over engineering and complication added to projects and the root cause of this is worry, I know, I use to be there doing it, it is difficult to step back and be objective to what the business needs, but as a DevOps professional that is your job. When delivering a solution try and remember these things to help you worry less and focus more:

  1. Before being perfect you must first just “be”
  2. When in doubt, do less
  3. If you do not know when the site is down you will not have a job
  4. Always have a backup

Then the delivery

The above list is rather quite useful, use it as a bit of guidance. Starting with point 1, some elaboration; when delivering a solution the most important thing is to deliver the solution, so many people forget this part and focus on the technicalities or whether or not it is the “best” way to deliver the solution. In reality, who cares, no one will care when you are in that meeting explaining why you’re late and have not got a working solution.

Getting stuck in the detail is a horrible place to be and sometimes it gets too involved or too complicated leading to much discussion and inevitably the solution comes out complicated and will take a while to deliver, in these situations point 2 comes in, just do less. It sounds silly but if you’re rushing around struggling to meet a deadline then you need to take things out of scope, and focus on what the actual solution needs to be, maybe you have to have a manual step, then at a later point you can automate it.

The last two points are along the same lines, and those lines are things that get you fired. If your site is down and you don’t know that it is totally down, that’s a bad thing; likewise loosing data is considered pretty poor. However do not get stuck in the trap of assuming you must have full monitoring of every server or that the backup needs to be anything more than a cron job for now.

The “trick” is always around identifying what needs to be done and could be done, by focusing on what needs to be done first you can then come back to improve the rest.

build, improve, rinse, repeat

As touched on earlier You are allowed to cut corners and focus on what is necessary, failure to do this will just lead to delays and a business that is getting rapidly turned off of DevOps. The first release you do can be complete and utter crap, it can be all manual, with nothing more than a simple web check on port 80, that is okay. The important thing is you deliver to the deadline, You have mitigated the main risks of not knowing when the site is down or the potential loss of data, heck even having single points failure are allowed as long as you can clearly identify what the risk is and a solution if that were to happen. In fact, I’d almost go as far to say this is expected.

The key is as always to improve, little and often. Step 1, Manual, Step 2, automate what is easy, Step 3, automate the rest. It has never been and will never be about perfection from version 0.1 onwards you just need to improve a little each time in line with that golden view of what perfection is. As long as you know what the end goal is you can work towards it, just don’t get carried away by trying to deliver it all for the first version.

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Business, Linux
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Join the conversation! 1 Comment

  1. The StartUpVitamins.com poster says it best: “Fuck it, ship it”. I’m all for mastering the details but getting caught up in analysis paralysis will destroy masterpieces just as easily as over-analyzing a work to death.

    Looking forward to more blogs like this!

    Reply

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